However, when the "banker" transferred her call to a "Bank Negara officer", she started to doubt herself and ended up losing RM25,498 of her savings. (Image by Pixabay: For Illustration purposes only)

KUANTAN: When a 39-year-old clerk received a phone call from a "bank officer" yesterday claiming she had an outstanding credit card balance, the woman knew it was a scam as she did not have an account with the bank.

However, when the "banker" transferred her call to a "Bank Negara officer", she started to doubt herself and ended up losing RM25,498 of her savings.

Pahang Commercial Crime Investigation Department chief Superintendent Mohd Wazir Mohd Yusof said it all started when the victim, from Cameron Highlands, picked up an anonymous phone call at 1pm on Tuesday.

He said the person on the other line, claiming to be a bank officer, told the victim that she had a RM6,000 outstanding credit card balance.

"The victim denied the claim outright saying she did not have an account with the financial institution.

"After that, the caller told the victim that her MyKad might have been misused by unknown individuals and that she needed to speak with a "Bank Negara officer" to settle her problem.

"Before she could say anthing, the call was transferred to a policeman who requested her banking information for verification purposes.

"Thinking that it might all be true, the victim obliged and gave her banking details including online banking information.

"Two hours later, she received text messages from her bank that she had transferred RM9,000 followed by RM11,500 and RM4,998 from her bank to another account." he said.

At this juncture, Wazir said the victim realised she had been cheated and immediately lodged a police report.

He said that Macau scam was known for using such tactics to convince victims into divulging their banking details.

He said the case was being investigated under Section 420 of the Penal Code for cheating, which provides for a maximum jail term of 10 years and whipping, and a fine if convicted.